✅ Fact Checked
Updated on January 16, 2023
Michael Colt, Bachelor Computer Science Degree & Computer Engineering.
Written by
Michael Colt, Bachelor Veterinary Medicine & Animal Science.
Ella Williams
Fact Checked by
Ella Williams
Dr. Michael Colt is a highly qualified veterinarian and animal scientist. He has extensive knowledge and experience in the care and treatment of animals, and a deep understanding of the latest scientific research in the field. Dr. Colt is dedicated to promoting the health and well-being of animals, and is committed to providing the highest level of care to his patients. Holds a Bachelors Degree in Veterinary Medicine from Middle Tennessee State University.

⭐ Fun Fact ⭐
Did you know that hedgehogs have a unique and amazing adaptation for survival? They have the ability to roll up into a tight ball when threatened, protecting their soft underbelly and face with their spines. This defense mechanism is so effective that predators such as foxes and birds of prey often give up trying to attack them.
Are you hearing strange rustling in your walls or finding tiny hedgehog droppings in your home? You may have a hedgehog visitor who has made themselves a little too comfortable in your abode. Don’t worry, you’re not alone. Hedgehogs are curious creatures and they may accidentally wander into your home in search of food or shelter. But now that they’re in, you may be wondering How To Get A Hedgehog Out Of My House?

Well, have no fear! In this article, we’ll guide you through the process of safely and humanely removing a hedgehog from your home. From identifying hedgehog entry points to using humane traps, we’ve got you covered. Not only will you learn how to get rid of your hedgehog guest, but you’ll also learn how to prevent future hedgehog invasions.

But before we get started, it’s important to remember that hedgehogs are protected by law and it’s illegal to harm or kill them. So, let’s work together to safely remove the hedgehog and ensure they find a better home.

Are you ready to say goodbye to your hedgehog housemate and hello to a hedgehog-free home? Let’s dive in!

1Understanding hedgehogs

Have you ever come across a little critter scurrying around your house and wondered what on earth it could be? Well, if it was small, round, and covered in spiky hair, chances are you’ve encountered a hedgehog. These adorable creatures may seem like an unlikely house guest, but they do sometimes wander into homes in search of food or shelter.

But before we dive into how to safely relocate our prickly pal, let’s learn a little more about hedgehogs.

First off, hedgehogs are not native to North America, they’re originally from Europe, Asia, and Africa. In the wild, they typically make their homes in forests, grasslands, and gardens. They’re nocturnal animals, so they’re most active at night.

Hedgehogs have a unique set of physical features that make them quite easily recognizable. Their most striking characteristic is, of course, their spines. These aren’t actually hairs, but modified scales that cover their back, sides, and tail. When threatened, hedgehogs will roll up into a tight ball, protecting their soft underbelly and face with their spines.

Another characteristic of hedgehogs is their snout-like nose and small eyes and ears. They have a keen sense of smell and are able to detect food from a distance.

When it comes to diet, hedgehogs are opportunistic eaters. They’ll dine on insects, worms, snails, and even small mammals and reptiles. In urban areas, hedgehogs may also come across birdseed, pet food, or even scraps from our own meals.

So why do hedgehogs sometimes wander into our homes? Well, it could be due to a shortage of food or shelter in the wild. Sometimes they may also be looking for a mate or a place to raise their young. But regardless of their reasons, it’s important to remember that hedgehogs are wild animals and should not be kept as pets.

While it may be tempting to keep a hedgehog as a cute little companion, it’s crucial to remember that wild animals have specific needs and requirements that cannot be met in captivity. It’s also illegal in many states to keep wild animals as pets without proper permits.

In any case, if you do find a hedgehog in your house, the most important thing is to handle the situation carefully and humanely. Remember to always wear gloves, and avoid handling hedgehogs unless it is absolutely necessary. The best course of action is to provide a way for the hedgehog to safely leave the house on its own or call a professional wildlife expert to help relocate the animal.

In short, hedgehogs may seem like an unusual house guest, but they’re fascinating creatures with unique characteristics and behaviors. Remember to respect their wild nature and give them a helping hand to return to their natural habitat.

2Steps for getting a hedgehog out of the house

So, you’ve come across a hedgehog in your house and you’re wondering what to do next. First things first, it’s important to remember that hedgehogs are wild animals and should be handled with care. Here are some steps to safely and humanely help our spiky friend on its way.

First and foremost, it’s crucial to keep yourself and the hedgehog safe. Make sure to wear gloves to protect yourself from the hedgehog’s spines, and avoid handling the animal unless it is absolutely necessary.

Next, you’ll want to provide the hedgehog with a way to safely exit the house. If the hedgehog is in a room with a door, gently guide it towards the open door with a broom or a piece of cardboard. If the hedgehog is in a room without a door or a window, you can create a makeshift ramp for the hedgehog to climb out with. Use a piece of cardboard or a towel to create a slope for the hedgehog to walk up, and place it near an open window or door.

Once the hedgehog has made its way out of the house, it’s essential to make sure that it won’t be able to find its way back in. Hedgehogs can squeeze through surprisingly small openings, so check for any holes or cracks in the foundation or walls that the hedgehog might be able to use as an entry point. Seal these openings with a weatherproof sealant or wire mesh.

It’s also important to keep in mind that hedgehogs are attracted to food and shelter. Make sure to secure any food or garbage, and keep pet food and birdseed indoors.

Lastly, if you find yourself in a situation where you’re unable to safely remove a hedgehog from your house, it’s best to contact a wildlife expert for assistance. They have the knowledge and equipment to safely and humanely relocate wild animals.

So basically, handling a hedgehog in your house requires some care and preparation. By providing a safe exit, sealing entry points, and keeping food and garbage secure, you can ensure a safe and humane relocation for the hedgehog. And if you’re uncertain, don’t hesitate to contact a professional for help.

3Prevention measures

Now that you’ve successfully helped our hedgehog friend on its way, you may be wondering how to prevent this situation from happening again in the future. The good news is, there are a few simple steps you can take to hedgehog-proof your house.

First and foremost, it’s important to keep in mind that hedgehogs are attracted to food and shelter. Make sure to secure any food or garbage, and keep pet food and birdseed indoors. This will discourage hedgehogs from hanging around your house in the first place.

Next, you’ll want to check for any holes or cracks in the foundation or walls that a hedgehog might be able to use as an entry point. These can include gaps around pipes, vents, or cables, as well as holes in the foundation or walls. Seal these openings with a weatherproof sealant or wire mesh to prevent hedgehogs from sneaking in.

It’s also a good idea to keep your yard tidy and free of clutter. Hedgehogs are known to take shelter in piles of leaves, tall grass, or piles of wood. By keeping your yard clean and well-maintained, you’ll make it less appealing to hedgehogs and other wild animals.

Lastly, it’s important to remember that hedgehogs are wild animals and should be respected as such. Keep in mind that they have specific needs and requirements that cannot be met in captivity. It’s illegal in many states to keep wild animals as pets without proper permits.

So basically, preventing hedgehogs from entering your house is relatively simple. By keeping food and garbage secure, sealing entry points, keeping your yard tidy and respecting the wild nature of these animals, you can make your house less appealing to hedgehogs and other wild animals. Remember that the key is to be proactive and take action before the hedgehog has a chance to enter the house.

4FAQ

How do you get rid of a hedgehog in your house?

Are you dealing with a pesky hedgehog in your house? Don’t worry, getting rid of them can be a simple task with the right approach.

First things first, never harm the hedgehog. They are protected by law and it’s important to treat them humanely. The best way to remove a hedgehog from your home is to simply guide them back outside.

To do this, open all doors and windows to your garden, and then turn off all lights in the room. The hedgehog will naturally follow the light and make its way back outside. If you’re not sure where the hedgehog is, you can also use a flashlight to guide them towards an open door or window.

Another option is to use a box or laundry basket to gently scoop up the hedgehog and release them outside. Just make sure to wear gloves and approach the hedgehog slowly so you don’t startle it.

It’s important to remember that hedgehogs are nocturnal animals and they may come back if they find a source of food or shelter in your house. To prevent them from coming back, make sure to seal any holes or cracks in your walls, and clean up any food or waste that may be attracting them.

And there you have it! With these simple steps, you can safely and humanely get rid of a hedgehog in your house.

How do you lure a hedgehog out of hiding?

Are you trying to catch a glimpse of a hedgehog but it seems to be in hiding? Don’t worry, there are a few simple tricks you can use to lure them out of hiding.

First and foremost, hedgehogs are nocturnal animals, so the best time to spot them is during the night. Turn off all lights in the area and wait quietly to see if a hedgehog appears.

Another thing to keep in mind is that hedgehogs love to eat insects, so if you want to attract one, you can use mealworms or chopped up fruits as bait and place it near where you think the hedgehog may be hiding.

Another way to lure them out is by providing a safe shelter for them. You can place a small wooden shelter, such as a hedgehog house, in your garden. These shelters provide a warm and secure spot for hedgehogs to rest during the day.

Lastly, hedgehogs are naturally curious animals and they may come out of hiding to investigate new objects in their environment. You can try placing a small dish of water or a new toy near where the hedgehog is hiding to see if it will come out to investigate.

Keep in mind, hedgehogs are wild animals, they are shy, and may not be easily visible. But with a bit of patience and the right approach, you’ll be able to spot one in no time!

What should you do if you find a hedgehog?

If you come across a hedgehog in the wild, it’s important to know how to handle the situation properly.
First and foremost, never touch or pick up a hedgehog with your bare hands. They can carry diseases and can also be easily stressed out.
Instead, use a towel or gloves to gently scoop them up and place them in a box or carrier.

Now that you have the hedgehog safely contained, it’s important to assess its condition. Is it injured? Is it thin or malnourished? If so, it’s best to contact a local wildlife rehabilitator or vet as soon as possible.

If the hedgehog appears to be healthy, it’s best to leave it be. Hedgehogs are nocturnal creatures and are most active at night. So, if you found a hedgehog during the day, it’s likely that it was out foraging for food.
Place the hedgehog in an area close to where you found it and make sure it has a way to escape the carrier.

It’s important to remember that hedgehogs are wild animals and should be treated with respect. Observe from a safe distance and do not interfere with their natural behavior.
You can enjoy watching them as they forage for food and explore their surroundings.
It’s a wonderful opportunity to learn about these fascinating creatures and appreciate the wildlife in your area.

Where do hedgehogs like to hide in the house?

Hedgehogs are naturally curious creatures, but they also have a strong sense of self-preservation. They tend to hide in places where they feel safe and secure. Here are a few spots in the house where hedgehogs might like to tuck away.

Under furniture – Hedgehogs like to have a sense of security and what better place than under a couch or bed where they can’t be easily seen. They may also hide under furniture with lots of nooks and crannies like a bookcase or armoire.

In small spaces – Hedgehogs like to squeeze into tight spaces. They might hide in a cardboard box, a small cabinet or even a drawer left open just a bit.

In dark, quiet areas – Hedgehogs are nocturnal animals, so they prefer to hide in dark, quiet areas during the day. This could be a corner of a room, a closet or even a laundry hamper.

In plants – If you have any indoor plants, hedgehogs might like to hide in them. They may be attracted to the leaves and stems or the potting soil.

It’s important to remember that hedgehogs are wild animals and they should be treated with respect. If you have a hedgehog in your house, it’s best to provide a suitable habitat for them, with hiding places, food, and water and to let them be. They will come out at night to forage and explore their surroundings.

5Conclusion

Lastly, coming across a hedgehog in your house may seem like an unusual and daunting situation, but with the right knowledge and approach, you can safely and humanely help our spiky friend on its way.

It’s important to remember that hedgehogs are wild animals and should be handled with care. By providing a safe exit, sealing entry points, and keeping food and garbage secure, you can ensure a safe and humane relocation for the hedgehog. And if you’re uncertain, don’t hesitate to contact a professional for help.

But why stop there? By taking preventative measures such as securing food and garbage, sealing entry points and keeping your yard tidy, you can make your house less appealing to hedgehogs and other wild animals.

So next time you find a hedgehog in your house, don’t panic! Remember to handle the situation with care, respect the wild nature of these animals and give them a helping hand to return to their natural habitat. And most importantly, enjoy the rare opportunity to come across such an adorable critter!

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